snuggleFuzz

snuggleFuzz

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nprfreshair:

Today Scott Stossel shares his experience of living with debilitating anxiety and phobias. His book, “My Age of Anxiety: Fear, Hope, Dread and the Search of Peace of Mind" is part memoir and part medical and pharmaceutical history of anxiety. Stossel is high-functioning despite his various afflictions. He is the editor at The Atlantic Magazine. Contrary to his inner distress, his colleagues often describe him as calm. In his interview he explains why that is:

Some people say that in stressful situations I can seem unflappable, and I think that’s partly because I’m always kind of internally flapped. And so … when there’s actually something real to be concerned about, it’s actually less anxiety-provoking than these irrational things. It’s also fairly typical … of certain kinds of anxiety disorder sufferers, particularly people with panic disorder, [they] are exceptionally good at hiding it. They’re able to convey an impression of competence, calmness and confidence, which is maybe substantially real … but there’s an internal fear. … The gap between that and this façade where people see you as competent and effective — you’re always afraid of being exposed, which is in itself anxiety producing.One of my more recent therapists calls this phenomenon, Impression Management. Impression Management is not only a symptom of anxiety, because you’re worried about being exposed, but it’s also a cause because you’re constantly worried that the house of cards that is your outward image … is going to come crashing down.


Need to read this.

nprfreshair:

Today Scott Stossel shares his experience of living with debilitating anxiety and phobias. His book, “My Age of Anxiety: Fear, Hope, Dread and the Search of Peace of Mind" is part memoir and part medical and pharmaceutical history of anxiety. Stossel is high-functioning despite his various afflictions. He is the editor at The Atlantic Magazine. Contrary to his inner distress, his colleagues often describe him as calm. In his interview he explains why that is:

Some people say that in stressful situations I can seem unflappable, and I think that’s partly because I’m always kind of internally flapped. And so … when there’s actually something real to be concerned about, it’s actually less anxiety-provoking than these irrational things. It’s also fairly typical … of certain kinds of anxiety disorder sufferers, particularly people with panic disorder, [they] are exceptionally good at hiding it. They’re able to convey an impression of competence, calmness and confidence, which is maybe substantially real … but there’s an internal fear. … The gap between that and this façade where people see you as competent and effective — you’re always afraid of being exposed, which is in itself anxiety producing.

One of my more recent therapists calls this phenomenon, Impression Management. Impression Management is not only a symptom of anxiety, because you’re worried about being exposed, but it’s also a cause because you’re constantly worried that the house of cards that is your outward image … is going to come crashing down.

Need to read this.

Filed under anxiety impression management panic disorder books to read

217 notes

Susan Sontag’s journals: corrupted by gossip, self-righteousness and misanthropy, as any honest diary should be. She had a fierce intellect, but seemed to lack ordinary grace and goodwill. Alas, this was not her vocation: to be nice. Nor mine. I can’t help now but to begin excavating her tome of one-liners as potential epitaphs. Which of these would look best on my tombstone:
“Nothing exists unless I maintain it.”
“The nightmare is that there is only one world: this one.”
“The limits of my language are the limits of my world.” (quoting Wittenstein)
“So much in modern life that can be enjoyed, once one gets over the nausea of the replicate.”
“There is no greater corruptor than the word of God.”
“Solitude is endless. A whole new world. The desert.”
“I live inside a deep pain.”
“It’s over—just as suddenly, mysteriously, arbitrarily, unpredictably as it began.”
“My idolatry: I lusted after goodness.”
“Residue of childhood…”
“The important part of the dream is the analytic statement, not the narrative resolution.”
“Scholastic definition of time as the actualization of possibilities.”
“Underneath the depression, I found my anxiety.”
“Have I done all the living I’m going to do?”

METAPHOR IS A FALSE GOD

To be engraved upon my epitaph:


"Have I done all the living I’m going to do?"

Filed under Sufjan Stevens epitaph morbid ironic

1,220 notes

wellthatsadorable:

Sometimes I feel like all I’ve ever wanted were five adorable asian babies who are kick ass guitarists, you know?

(via moogod)

Filed under cute adorable guitar music amazing

1 note

We could all be thin if we were to adhere religiously to a pizza, beer, and ice cream diet.

Beer and Ice Cream Diet

As we all know, it takes 1 calorie to heat 1 gram of water 1 degree centigrade. Translated into meaningful terms, this means that if you eat a very cold dessert (generally consisting of water in large part), the natural processes which raise the consumed dessert to body temperature during the digestive cycle literally sucks the calories out of the only available source, your body fat.

For example, a dessert served and eaten at near 0 degrees C (32.2 deg. F) will in a short time be raised to the normal body temperature of 37 degrees C (98.6 deg. F). For each gram of dessert eaten, that process takes approximately 37 calories as stated above. The average dessert portion is 6 oz, or 168 grams. Therefore, by operation of thermodynamic law, 6,216 calories (1 cal./gm/deg. x 37 deg. x 168 gms) are extracted from body fat as the dessert’s temperature is normalized. Allowing for the 1,200 latent calories in the dessert, the net calorie loss is approximately 5,000 calories.

Obviously, the more cold dessert you eat,the better off you are and the faster you will lose weight, if that is your goal. This process works equally well when drinking very cold beer in frosted glasses. Each ounce of beer contains 16 latent calories, but extracts 1,036 calories (6,216 cal. per 6 oz. portion) in the temperature normalizing process. Thus the net calorie loss per ounce of beer is 1,020 calories. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to calculate that 12,240 calories (12 oz. x 1,020 cal./oz.) are extracted from the body in the process of drinking a can of beer.

Frozen desserts, e.g., ice cream, are even more beneficial, since it takes 83 cal./gm to melt them (i.e., raise them to 0 deg. C) and an additional 37 cal./gm to further raise them to body temperature. The results here are really remarkable, and it beats running hands down.

Unfortunately, for those who eat pizza as an excuse to drink beer, pizza (loaded with latent calories and served above body temperature) induces an opposite effect. But, thankfully, as the astute reader should have already reasoned, the obvious solution is to drink a lot of beer with pizza and follow up immediately with large bowls of ice cream.We could all be thin if we were to adhere religiously to a pizza, beer, and ice cream diet.

Happy eating!

School of Physics, University of Sydney

Original Link: http://astro.berkeley.edu/~gmarcy/thermal/tpteacher/jokes/icecream.html